WYW // Week 2 – Good Reports!

wearyourwardrobe

Well, we’re a couple of weeks down in the #wearyourwardrobe challenge.  Phew.

I have to admit, this is making me really acutely aware of how very much I love clothes.  I love them a lot.  A LOT.  I’ve had pangs of desire and definitely stood in front of my wardrobe this week and thought ‘IAMBOREDANDIHAVENOTHINGTOWEAR’ but there have been significant moments that have given me a spur.  I want to share a couple with you:

–  One of my best friends asked me to do some shopping for her to revamp her wardrobe after having a baby.  She’s also an ethically conscious mama so I was given a budget for her and only allowed to buy stuff from second-hand/pre-loved clothing websites.  It scratched an itch, and I miiiiiight have ended up with a little basket of lovely clothes from ebay stored away for another time (THAT TOTALLY DOESN’T COUNT) but I did not succumb.  Here are a couple of the things I picked out for her:

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This retro top from Rokit.

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This lilac polka dot tunic from ASOS Marketplace
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This ridiculously awesome rainbow checked dress also from ASOS Marketplace.

It really IS easy to find cool, fun clothing without buying new.  I was reaffirmed in that this week.

–  One of the BEST things about this challenge is the company of other people doing it too.  My friend Danielle in Canada texted me out of the blue to tell me her daughter, Olivia (who turn 13 this week!!) was taking the challenge!  I am so so impressed – I’m not sure there are many 12 year old image-conscious girls willing to make these kind of moral choices these days – so so awesome.   She sent me this message/picture yesterday and it made my day!
Liv

SO SO PROUD OF YOU LIV!!! x

–  Speaking of Canadians – my mum and Auntie Moe are also doing the WYW challenge.  Let me tell you, these ladies can SHOP.  My folks live close to the American border and often hop over for shopping excursions because the exchange rate can be good for buying stuff in the US.  My mum and Moe have been known to not return home until 3am, hitting up every mall, scouring the bargain rails for the best deals including late night stops at the 24hr Meijers.  My mum has more clothes than you can shake a stick at, so I was in awe that they took a trip Stateside last week and came back with ZIP!  GO LADIES!

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Now, it would be wrong of me not to reiterate that this challenge is much more than just not buying clothes.  Our pounds and dollars are handed over so easily these days and it’s easy to be an ignorant consumer; but those pounds and dollars feed an economy that works on supply and demand in the market.

The culture of fast fashion speaks volumes to the fashion outlets and companies who produce our garments.  By buying new clothes so often and only because of passing trends we are using our money to say to them that we don’t really care where our stuff comes from.  We. Want. Stuff.  And we want it cheap.  Do whatever you need to do to get it to me cheaply.

But the cost is high for someone.

Someone down the line will pay for our demand for cheap clothing and our throwaway culture.  They will pay with dangerous working conditions, workplace abuse & harassment, very little pay and the threat of job loss if they don’t work faster, longer etc etc etc.

This is a great article to showcase how fast fashion is ALL of our responsibility.

I would really love (even if you aren’t doing the challenge) to take action with me.  I’ve mentioned the Make Fashion Traffik Free campaign that I feel really strongly about, but there are plenty of ways to take some action to ensure justice for the workers in the garment factories behind much of our clothing.

Here’s something to get you going:   This petition calls on the companies who had workers that died or were injured in the Rana Plaza Factory collapse in Bangladesh to pay compensation to the victims or families of victims.  Some companies are dragging their heels to give any support to the orphans and families who now have no income to support themselves and they should.  Read more about what happened at the Rana Plaza Factory in this blog post I wrote a while ago.

You can use your money wisely, and you can use your voice as well.

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